Tuesday, November 19, 2019

Monthly Archives: August 2019

Get to know our new Forest School Principal, Ian Abraham!

Ian Abraham comes to us most recently as the Youth Programs Manager at Portland Audubon, overseeing and developing programs for tens of thousands of youth. We’re so excited to have him join us, and wanted to share that enthusiasm with you as the school year gets started. Read on to learn more about Ian’s background, experience, and philosophy. And go here to learn more about learning at Trackers Forest School

Ian, why Trackers?

IA: I was fortunate enough to be a part of some of the earlier discussions that have now become known as Trackers Earth. While the ideals and philosophies back then were new, I have had the pleasure of watching the organization, program, and work grow into a movement that is connecting thousands of youth and adults to the natural world and themselves.

What are you most excited for in joining the Trackers Earth Forest School team?

IA: I have made it my life’s work to facilitate a nature connection for adults and youth alike. Over the past 13 years, I have spent my career as an Environmental Educator, Camp Director, and finally the Youth Programs Manager with Portland Audubon. I have also spent the last three years co-mentoring teen boys on a weekly basis with a focus on mindfulness and socialization skills. I have wholeheartedly mentored dozens of teens and educators throughout my time at Audubon and beyond. This path has allowed me to form relationships with youth and nature in a holistic and whole systems learning environment wherein nature is the ultimate teacher, providing an experiential learning environment like no other.

My personal values and mission align so well with those of the Forest School. It is rare that one has an opportunity to have such succinct alignment with personal values and organizational values. This chance to work with children, parents, and teachers within a community steeped in nature is what I am most excited for.

What’s your education philosophy? Or give me some central tenets.

IA: The strictly formal education that I received as a child was founded in human to human relationships and, as much as I appreciated that, it was always missing something. I believe that education is based in relationships between people, and the more than human world, wherein nature is the ultimate teacher.

Education should be a hands-on, experiential practice wherein children gain a working understanding of subjects, knowledge, and skills while developing lifelong critical thinking skills and core competencies. Academic learning is supported through earth-based skills through story, music, art, song, providing a whole systems environment for all learners… visual, oral, or/and kinesthetic.

How is the format and curriculum of Forest School uniquely posed to be beneficial to real learning?

IA: Unlike other forms of environmental education that are a one-off program, Forest School is an apex opportunity, allowing students and teachers to walk together in relationship with the natural world, all the while learning math and reading and writing in courageous and competent ways. I’ve never been a part of a program with this kind of consistency — full-day learning, five days a week, nine months of the year. With this amount of student-contact time, I’m excited to watch their progression throughout the year. Their progressions—teachers and students alike—are based in our ability, as a school, to give primacy to relationships, and create meaningful, honest, long-term mentoring that centers the student’s experience.

Trackers Forest School provides a unique opportunity to blend academics with hands-on learning. Full-time school for grades K-8, and a micro high school that meets three days a week. Ian’s background in administering and planning interdisciplinary curriculum makes him well-suited to lead Trackers Forest School into the next academic year and beyond. Come to our next Open House to meet Ian and learn more about the Forest School educational environment.